The iPad: the modern day Pop-Up-Book

Earlier this week I wrote about how [the iPad has the unique opportunity to change how publishers make money](http://www.majordojo.com/2010/04/its-the-experience-stupid.php). This opportunity exists by shifting their focus away from trying to create as much content as possible, and focus rather on designing and crafting unique and compelling reading experiences that customers *want* to pay for. Then later this week, Cody Brown [wrote on TechCrunch](http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/11/dear-authors-your-next-book-should-be-an-app-not-an-ibook/) in a piece called “Dear Authors, Your Next Book Should be an App, Not an iBook”:
> The mission of an author isn’t to get you to ‘read all the words’, it’s to communicate in the rawest sense of the word. Whether you’re Jeff Jarvis or Dan Brown, you have an idea or a story and a book is a way to express it to the world.
The iPad then provides content creators a new platform for communication. A way for readers to engage with text, story, narrative and information. Take a look at one person has done in retelling *Alice in Wonderland* on the iPad (a [free book in the public domain](http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/11)):

Its like a modern day pop-up book! One that invites the user to interact with the story and to seek out and discover new ways in which you can interact with the page. So imagine the kind of experience one could craft if you retold the [Da Vinci Code](http://www.amazon.com/Da-Vinci-Code-Dan-Brown/dp/0385504209) on the iPad?
What I am seeing is the chance for the iPad to redefine how we experience text itself. Text will no longer be a wholly static medium, but one that is increasingly adaptive and interactive.

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The iPad: the modern day Pop-Up-Book

Earlier this week I wrote about how [the iPad has the unique opportunity to change how publishers make money](http://www.majordojo.com/2010/04/its-the-experience-stupid.php). This opportunity exists by shifting their focus away from trying to create as much content as possible, and focus rather on designing and crafting unique and compelling reading experiences that customers *want* to pay for. Then later this week, Cody Brown [wrote on TechCrunch](http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/11/dear-authors-your-next-book-should-be-an-app-not-an-ibook/) in a piece called “Dear Authors, Your Next Book Should be an App, Not an iBook”:
> The mission of an author isn’t to get you to ‘read all the words’, it’s to communicate in the rawest sense of the word. Whether you’re Jeff Jarvis or Dan Brown, you have an idea or a story and a book is a way to express it to the world.
The iPad then provides content creators a new platform for communication. A way for readers to engage with text, story, narrative and information. Take a look at one person has done in retelling *Alice in Wonderland* on the iPad (a [free book in the public domain](http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/11)):

Its like a modern day pop-up book! One that invites the user to interact with the story and to seek out and discover new ways in which you can interact with the page. So imagine the kind of experience one could craft if you retold the [Da Vinci Code](http://www.amazon.com/Da-Vinci-Code-Dan-Brown/dp/0385504209) on the iPad?
What I am seeing is the chance for the iPad to redefine how we experience text itself. Text will no longer be a wholly static medium, but one that is increasingly adaptive and interactive.



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